America

Cohune oil Description

Cohune oil

Cohune oil

Cohune oil is pressed from the seeds of the cohune palm, which is native to central and south america. Along with other byproducts of the palm, cohune oil is believed to have been used by cultures in southern mesoamerica since the pre-columbian era, in particular by the maya. Uses of the oil include as a lubricant, for cooking, soapmaking and lamp oil. For this latter purpose the oil was placed in earthenware or soapstone lamps and lit with a wick, for cooking and illumination.

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Raspeseed oil Description

Raspeseed oil

Rapeseed (Brassica napus), also known as rape, oilseed rape, rapa, rappi, rapaseed (and, in the case of one particular group ofcultivars, canola), is a bright yellow flowering member of the family Brassicaceae (mustard or cabbage family). The name derives from the Latin for turnip, rapa or rapum, and is first recorded in English at the end of the 14th century. Older writers usually distinguished the turnip and rape by the adjectives round and long(-rooted), respectively.See also Brassica napobrassica, which may be considered a variety of Brassica napus.

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Brominated vegetable oil Description

Brominated vegetable oil

Brominated vegetable oil (BVO) is vegetable oil that has had atoms of the element bromine bonded to it. Brominated vegetable oil is used as an emulsifier in citrus-flavored soft drinks to help natural fat-soluble citrus flavors stay suspended in the drink and to produce a cloudy appearance. BVO has been used by the soft drink industry since 1931.

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Buffalo gourd oil Description

Buffalo gourd oil

Buffalo gourd oil is a seed oil, extracted from the seeds of the Cucurbita foetidissima, which is native to southwest North America.
 As the Latin name of the plant indicates, the vine has a foul smell. The seeds of the Buffalo gourd are rich in oil and protein, and were used by American Indians to make soap.
 

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Ben oil Description

Ben oil

Ben oil is pressed from the seeds of the Moringa oleifera, known variously as the horseradish tree, ben oil tree, or drumstick tree. The oil is characterized by an unusually long shelf life and a mild, but pleasant taste. The name of the oil is derived from the high quantity of behenic acid. Seeds offer a relatively high yield of 22-38% oil. Ben oil has been used for thousands of years as a perfume base, and continues to be used in the capacity today. The oil can also be used as a fuel.

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Cocklebur oil Description

Cocklebur oil

Cocklebur oil

Cocklebur oil is obtained by pressing the seeds of the cocklebur (xanthium ssp.), a plant that is otherwise considered an agricultural pest that can harm or kill livestock. The oil is similar to poppyseed oil, light yellow in color, and similar to sunflower oil in taste and smell.

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Candlenut oil Description

Candlenut oil

Candlenut oil or kukui nut oil is extracted from the nut of the Aleurites moluccana, the candlenut or kuku'i. The candlenut originates in Hawai'i.
The word kukui means "enlightened" in Hawai'ian. The oil contains 19% oleic acid, 41% linoleic acid, and less than 27% linolenic acid.
Candlenut oil is light yellow, with an amber tint, and has a shelf life of 6-8 months.[2] Historically, it has been valued as an emollient, and is currently used primarily in skin care products.Kukui Nut oil absorbs into your skin quickly and easily without blocking skin pores.
 

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Canola oil Description

Canola oil

Canola refers to a cultivar of either Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) or field mustard (Brassica campestris L. or Brassica Rapa var.). Its seeds are used to produce edible oil suitable for consumption by humans and livestock. The oil is also suitable for use as biodiesel.

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